lotus
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Online Course in Meditation

Course Materials

Course Outline

Week-by-Week Course Contents

Session One

Meditation Theory

  • Benefits of meditative calming
  • Methods to calm the mind
  • Basic skills of meditation

Meditation Practice

  • Sitting meditation: mindfulness of thoughts

Concepts

  • To study the self
  • Mind training
  • Threefold training: morality, meditation, discernment
  • Moral discipline
    • Precepts
    • Compassion and self-compassion
    • Bodhicitta: the awakening mind
    • The bodhisattva commitments
  • Śamatha: meditative calming
  • The two wings of meditation: calming and discernment

Session Two

Meditation Theory

  • Prerequisites for meditation
  • Attitude in meditation
  • Cycle of practice

Meditation Practice

  • Sitting meditation: counting the breath

Concepts

  • Four noble truths
  • Suffering
  • Eightfold path
  • Enlightenment
  • Buddha's enlightenment
  • Chan/Zen

Session Three

Meditation Theory

  • Wrong ideas of meditation
  • Clearing karma and overcoming afflictions
  • Detachment
  • Letting go
  • Dealing with obstacles to meditation
  • Releases in meditation

Meditation Practice

  • Sitting meditation: Left-Right Lotus

Concepts

  • Impermanence
  • Conditioned arising
  • Interconnectedness

Session Four

Meditation Theory

  • Dullness and excitement in meditation

Meditation Practice

  • Sitting meditation: using a mantra

Concepts

  • Cycle of rebirth
  • Karma and rebirth

Session Five

Meditation Theory

  • Balancing stability and clarity
  • Qigong to feel like air

Meditation Practice

  • Internal aspects of Qigong movements
  • Standing meditation: basic posture

Concepts

  • Samsara
  • Nirvana

Session Six

Meditation Theory

  • Correcting problems in meditation
  • Dealing with difficulties

Meditation Practice

  • Standing meditation: hand postures
  • Standing meditation: heels

Concepts

  • Afflictions
  • The three poisons

Session Seven

Meditation Theory

  • The three times
  • Seven phases of meditative development
  • Enlightenment

Meditation Practice

  • Walking meditation: Lotus Walk (normal walking)

Concepts

  • Buddhanature
  • Original enlightenment

Session Eight

Meditation Theory

  • Changes brought about by meditation
  • Signs of progress
  • Equanimity

Meditation Practice

  • Walking meditation: slow walking

Concepts

  • The three gates of liberation: emptiness, signlessness, aimlessness
  • The first gate: emptiness
  • Not-self

Session Nine

Meditation Theory

  • Mindfulness practice in daily life
  • Healing in meditation

Meditation Practice

  • Reclining meditation

Concepts

  • Second gate of liberation: signlessness
    • Real and unreal thought — ignorance
    • Levels of consciousness — manas and mano
    • Beyond language and concepts: the ineffable
  • Suchness

Session Ten

Meditation Theory

  • Nine stages in progress in meditation
  • Mirror mind
  • Silent illumination

Meditation Practice

  • Sitting meditation: silent illumination

Concepts

  • Third gate of liberation: aimlessness, wishlessness, without intention or desires
  • Ordinary mind

 

Preparation for Course

Before our First Session

Expectations and Groundrules

  1. Payment in advance, please — email transfer.
  2. The expectation is that you will attend all online sessions. Communicate with Jack regarding any exceptions.
  3. This is an experiential course. It is vital to maintain a practice of daily meditation so that the real learning can take place. Try to practice at least 30 minutes every day.
  4. Some of the readings are required. This is to help you grasp the concepts and be able to contribute to the discussions. Read each week's assigned readings in advance of the online session. There is also a reading list of good books posted on the Meditation Resources page under Meditation to help you get started with more thorough reading. The lists there provide references for the works cited in this course.
  5. On-line sessions will feature instruction by Jack and group discussions. Please, participate in these discussions and, of course, do so respectfully.
  6. Keeping a journal will help you clarify and reflect on what your are experiencing and learning. A journal will have the most impact if you make regular and frequent entries.
  7. After each weekly session there will be an evaluation and reflection form emailed to you. Use Adobe Reader to reply following the instructions in the email.
  8. At the end of the course you will be emailed a longer evaluation form.
  9. Jack is available to discuss your practice or your questions. For one-on-one consultation at any time contact Jack and request a personal Zoom session. Give two suggested times when this might happen.

Equipment for On-line Sessions

  1. High speed internet access with valid email account.
  2. Desktop computer, laptop or tablet. A smartphone will not be sufficient.
  3. Zoom computer application. This is a free download from https://zoom.us/pricing.
  4. Up-to-date version of Adobe Reader. This is a free download from https://get.adobe.com/reader/otherversions/.
  5. A quiet, well-lit space where there is room to do some qigong and where you won't be disturbed for the period of online sessions. Make sure your face is well illuminated so that other participants can see you clearly.
  6. Have your meditation chair ready for on-line practice.

Meditation chair

  • The platform should be flat and horizontal. Avoid scooped, rounded or slanted chairs.
  • The height should be such that your thighs are horizontal. With your feet flat on the floor, there are two conditions to avoid:
    • Knees up — this would cause you to use abdominal muscles to hold yourself upright and would be very tiring.
    • Knees down — this would cut off blood flow under the thighs causing pain or numbness..
  • The back of the chair should be as upright as possible.
  • The size of the platform should accommodate your behind easily. Overhang will cause blood flow to be cut off. Make sure you can sit comfortably on the chair without having to be pushed up against the back. See if you can sit erect with your back free of the back of the chair.
  • Cushions aren't necessary but can be nice for extended sitting. Make sure your cushion is not lumpy. Many cushions are too soft to be of any use for long sits. Mountain Equipment Coop sells a nice blue foam stadium cushion for about $11.00.
  • Ikea As-Is is a good place to find chairs. Most of their dining chairs are flat. I recently started using a Stefan that cost $25.00 at Ikea. You can get a matching cushion for under $10.00 that's pretty useful. (http://www.ikea.com/ca/en/catalog/products/00211088/).

Home Space

Try to set up a space where you can meditate daily.

  • A place where you feel safe.
  • A quiet space where you won't be disturbed and that's as free as possible from sounds from inside or outside the house.
  • A comfortable space — not too hot or too cold, without drafts.
  • If you have the space, see whether you can devote some of it to your meditation practice. It's nice not to have to move things around too much when you set up for meditation.
  • You might be able to dedicate a room or part of a room to your practice. Arrange simple and beautiful objects that remind you of your vocation to meditation. Some people set up altars but that's up to you.
  • Avoid clutter. Set up your chair in a place where you won't have bright or distracting things in your field of vision.

Meditation Timer

  • For Android users download Zazen Meditation Timer (by Stefan Gaffga) from the Google Play store or the iphone eqivalent.
    • It's free. It comes with a couple of example routines but you will likely want to delete or modify these.
    • The gongs are recorded from Zen monasteries in various places around the world.
    • I have created several profiles for myself of differing lengths and named them according to the various lengths of time.
  • For iPhone users I can direct you to this site for some recommendations: https://tricycle.org/trikedaily/meditation-timer-app/.
  • Settings for a Meditation Session

  • If you are using Zazen Meditation Timer here is how to set up a routine for a 30-minute meditation session that consists of one period of meditation set off by lovely gongs:
    • Top right menu > New Session
    • Session Name: "30 Minute"
    • Session Description: "Meditation"
    • First Section (this is a lead-in period to allow you to settle yourself after you have pushed the button):
      • Set Time: 10 seconds
      • Section Name: "Start"
      • Bell Count: one
      • Bell Gap: (does not apply)
      • Bell Volume: (I set it near the middle on the scale but this depends on the size and privacy of your room and how close you will be to your phone.)
      • Gong Sound: Japanese Rhinbowl Tang, 164mm
    • Second Section (this is the meditation period):
      • Set Time: 30 minutes
      • Section Name: "Meditate"
      • Bell Count: one
      • Bell Gap: (does not apply)
      • Bell Volume: (I set it at about a quarter of the scale. You will want to keep this pretty quiet so you don't startle yourself.)
      • Gong Sound: Japanese Rhinbowl Dharma, 88mm (black, glazed)
    • To create more sessions go to Menu > Duplicate Session. Then you simply have to change the bits you want to such as Time and Name.
    • Note: I created "Quiet" verions of some of my profiles with very low volume for those times when I don't want to disturb people. I just duplicated the ones I wanted, stuck "Quiet" on the front of the name and changed the volume of the gongs to very low.

Journal

  • Buy yourself a nice blank journal and pen. Or use a nice diary app. (I use Diaro on my phone and desktop.)
  • Use your journal every day to record:
    1. What you are learning from the classes, readings etc.
    2. Your experiences of meditation:
    • What posture and length of time?
    • What method were you using?
    • What were you mindful of trying and what helped?
    • What problems did you encounter and how did you deal with them?
    • What did you experience?
    • What did you feel afterward?
    • What do you think and feel about the experience?

The Path of Meditation by Jack Risk

  • PDF copy for sale for $10.00. Email transfer.
  • To see a list of the contents go to this page (first panel).
  • I'm planning to revise this book and expand it considerably. But not for a few more years.

Introductory Session

Introductory Session: Getting to Know Each Other and Checking Connections

Presentation Slides

 

Session 1

Session 1: Training in Meditation

Theme Poems

Invariably, this is the moment to study the way.

Dogen. Moon in a Dewdrop: Writings of Zen Master Dogen. Translated by K. Tanahashi. New York: North Point Press, 1985.

Mind itself
is the mind that leads
mind into confusion
so never release the bridle
of the horse of your mind

Ryokan. Translated by Stephen Addiss. Zen Sourcebook. Hackett Publishing, 2008, 257.

Even if you consume as many books
As the sands of the Ganges
It is not as good as really catching
One verse of Zen.
If you want the secret of Buddhism,
Here it is: everything is in the heart!

Ryokan. Dewdrops on a Lotus Leaf: Zen Poems of Ryokan. J. Stevens, trans. Boston and London:Shambhala, 2004

Readings

Assigned Readings

  1. Dhammapada, "Mind"
  2. Anguttara Nikaya (Buddha). "Mastering the Mind"
  3. Richard Bryan McDaniel. Prologue in India
  4. Thich Nhat Hanh. Mindfulness

Traditional Readings

  1. Ryokan. In stillness by the empty window
  2. Dogen. Rules for Zazen (Zazen-gi)

Modern Readings

  1. Donald S. Lopez. Glossary
  2. BTTS. Some Important Terms
  3. Shunryu Suzuki. Beginner's Mind
  4. Perry Schmidt-Leukel. The Buddha
  5. Perry Schmidt-Leukel. Buddhist Meditation
  6. Perry Schmidt-Leukel. The Bodhisattva Ideal
  7. Joan Halifax. Tonglen Practice

Short Readings by Theme

  1. Short quotes and poems on mindfulness
  2. Short quotes and poems on bodhicitta
  3. Short quotes and poems on the bodhisattva
  4. Short quotes and poems on compassion
  5. Short quotes and poems on calming the mind
  6. Short quotes and poems on threefold training

Presentation Slides

Videos

Homework for the Coming Week

Daily Practice: sitting meditation with mindfulness of thoughts.


Beyond your formal meditation practice, try to practice mindfulness throughout the day. Pay close attention to what is happening. Try to sense what you are experiencing at every moment. Be in the moment. Try not to let yourself be carried away in idle thoughts or speculation. Bring yourself back to experiencing the present moment whenever thoughts or emotions carry you away.

 

Session 2

Session 2: To End all Suffering

 

Theme Poem

All experience is preceded by mind,
   Led by mind,
   Made by mind.
Speak or act with a corrupted mind,
   And suffering follows
As the wagon wheel follows the hoof of the ox.

All experience is preceded by mind,
   Led by mind,
   Made by mind.
Speak or act with a peaceful mind,
   And happiness follows
Like a never-departing shadow.

The Dhammapada: A New Translation of the Buddhist Classic with Annotations. Translated by Gil Fronsdal. Shambhala: 2006

I see people endlessly striving
Wrapped up in themselves like silkworms.
Totally motivated by the love of money,
They allow themselves no leisure;
As time passes, they lose their self-nature.
Year after year they become more foolish.
One day they will travel to the Yellow Springs
Where even their names are forgotten.
There are so many people like this—
Ah, I can’t bear even to talk about it!

Ryokan. Translated by Stephen Addiss in Zen Sourcebook: Traditional Documents from China, Korea and Japan. Edited by Stephen Addiss with Stanley Lombardo and Judith Roitman. Indianapolis and Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company, 2008, p. 256.
Note: Yellow Springs refers to the realm of the dead in Shinto mythology.

Readings

Assigned Readings

  1. Samyutta Nikaya (Buddha). "The Dart of Painful Feeling"
  2. Richard Bryan McDaniel. Bodhidharma
  3. Richard Bryan McDaniel. Huineng

Traditional Readings

  1. Dogen. Recommending Zazen for All People (Fukanzazengi)
  2. Guifeng Zongmi. The Sources of Chan

Modern Readings

  1. Donald S. Lopez. Story of the Buddha
  2. Lama Dudjom Dorjee. The Four Noble Truths and Eightfold Path
  3. Perry Schmidt-Leukel. The Four Noble Truths and Eightfold Path

Short Readings by Theme

  1. Short quotes and poems on faith
  2. Short quotes and poems on samsara
  3. Short quotes and poems on meditation
  4. Short quotes and poems on not thinking

Presentation Slides

Videos

Homework for the Coming Week

 

Session 3

Session 3: This World is Not Permanent

 

Theme Poems

The moon
abiding in the midst of
serene mind;
billows break
into light.

Dogen. Essential Zen edited by Kazuoki Tanahashi, 21

Like a drifting cloud,
Bound by nothing:
I just let go
Giving myself up
To the whim of the wind.

Ryokan. Dewdrops on a Lotus Leaf: Zen Poems of Ryokan. J. Stevens, trans. Boston and London: Shambhala, 2004

To see the world in a grain of sand
And a heaven in a wild flower,
Hold infinity in the palm of your hand
And eternity in an hour…

William Blake. Auguries of Innocence

 

Readings

Assigned Readings

  1. Samyutta Nikaya (Buddha). "Dependent Origination (Conditioned Arising)"
  2. Kosho Uchiyama. The Four Seals
  3. Keido Fukushima. Zen and Compassion

Traditional Readings

  1. Diamond Sutra. "Detachment"

Modern Readings

  1. Sheng-yen. Conditioned Arising
  2. Keido Fukushima. Dependent Origination

Short Readings by Theme

  1. Short quotes and poems on conditioned arising
  2. Short quotes and poems on detachment
  3. Short quotes and poems on impermanence
  4. Short quotes and poems on letting go

Presentation Slides

Videos

Homework for the Coming Week

 

Session 4

Session 4: The Treadmill of Life and Death

 

Theme Poem

When will the treadmill of life and death stop
each rebirth gets more confusing
until we discover the jewel of our mind
we’re like blind mules following our feet

Han Shan. Han Shan. The Collected Songs of Cold Mountain. Translated by R. Pine, Trans. Port Townsend, WA: Copper Canyon Press, 2000.

Readings

Assigned Readings

  1. Dogen. Yaoshan's Nonthinking
  2. Sheng-yen. Karma

Traditional Readings

  1. Kamalasila. Serenity and Discernment

Modern Readings

  1. Perry Schmidt-Leukel. The Cycle of Rebirth, Karma, Samsara
  2. Gen Lamrimpa. Dealing with Laxity and Excitement

Short Readings by Theme

  1. Short quotes and poems on karma
  2. Short quotes and poems on buddhahood
  3. Short quotes and poems on enlightenment

Presentation Slides

Videos

Homework for the Coming Week

 

Session 5

Session 5: Samsara and Nirvana

 

Theme Poem

Nirvana means no birth and no death.
It’s beyond birth and death and beyond nirvana.
When the mind stops moving, it enters nirvana.
Nirvana is an empty mind.
Where delusions don’t exist, buddhas reach nirvana.
Where afflictions don’t exist, bodhisattvas enter the place of enlightenment.

Bodhidharma. Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma. Translated by R. Pine. New York: Weatherhill, 1987.

Readings

Assigned Readings

  1. Mumonkan, "Case 29: Huineng and the Flag"
  2. Kosho Uchiyama. Waking Up

Traditional Readings

  1. Samyutta Nikaya (Buddha). "Samsara"
  2. Majjhima Nikaya (Buddha). "Enlightenment"
  3. Majjhima Nikaya (Buddha). "Nonreturning"

Modern Readings

  1. Kosho Uchiyama. Samsara - Living Out the Reality of Life
  2. Jack Risk. Dealing with Disturbing Thoughts
  3. Jack Risk. A Balanced Mind

Short Readings by Theme

  1. Short quotes and poems on clarity
  2. Short quotes and poems on nirvana
  3. Short quotes and poems on realization

Presentation Slides

Videos

Homework for the Coming Week

 

Session 6

Session 6: Afflictions and the Three Poisons

 

Theme Poem

Keep your heart clear and transparent
And you’ll never be bound.
A single disturbed thought, though,
Creates ten thousand distractions.
Let myriad things captivate you
And you’ll go further and further astray.
How painful to see people
All wrapped up in themselves.

Ryokan. Dewdrops on a Lotus Leaf: Zen Poems of Ryokan. J. Stevens, trans. Boston and London: Shambhala, 2004

Readings

Assigned Readings

  1. Chinul. Cultivating the Mind
  2. Sheng-yen. Making Progress in Waves

Traditional Readings

  1. Buddha. Hindrances
  2. Dhammapada, "Cravings"
  3. Huineng. Platform Sutra

Modern Readings

  1. Dalai Lama. The Afflictions
  2. Lama Dudjom Dorjee. The Three Poisons

Short Readings by Theme

  1. Short quotes and poems on afflictions
  2. Short quotes and poems on skills for maintaining meditation

Presentation Slides

Videos

Homework for the Coming Week

 

Session 7

Session 7: Our Buddhanature

 

Theme Poem

Deluded, a buddha is a being
enlightened a being is a buddha
a foolish buddha is a being
a wise being is a buddha
a biased buddha is a being
an unbiased being is a buddha
as long as your mind is biased
the buddha dwells in a being
the moment you wake up unbiased
a being becomes a buddha
your mind contains a buddha
your buddha is the real one
if you didn’t have the buddha-mind
where would you go to find a buddha?

Platform Sutra: The Zen Teaching of Hui-neng. Translated by R. Pine. Berkeley, CA: Counterpoint, 2006.

Readings

Assigned Readings

  1. Hakuin. Song of Meditation
  2. Sheng-yen. Seven Phases of Meditative Development

Traditional Readings

  1. Bodhidharma
  2. Empty Cloud. Prerequisites for Beginning Chan Practice

Modern Readings

  1. Keido Fukushima. Bodhidharma
  2. Sheng-yen. Buddhanature
  3. Kosho Uchiyama. True Self
  4. Kosho Uchiyama. The World of Self
  5. Sheng-yen. The Enlightenment Experience
  6. Omori Sogen. No Thought and No Thinking

Short Readings by Theme

  1. Short quotes and poems on buddhanature
  2. Short quotes and poems on equanimity
  3. Short quotes and poems on joy

Presentation Slides

Videos

Homework for the Coming Week

 

Session 8

Session 8: Emptiness

 

Theme Poems

The birds have vanished from the sky.
Now the last cloud drains away.
We sit together, the mountain and me,
until only the mountain remains.

Han Shan. The Collected Songs of Cold Mountain. Translated by R. Pine, Trans. Port Townsend, WA: Copper Canyon Press, 2000.

As before a precious mirror,
the form and reflection gaze on each other –
you are not it,
but it is just you.

Yongjia Xuanjue. Song of Enlightenment. The Poetry of Enlightenment: Poems by Ancient Ch'an Masters. Translated by Sheng Yen. Elmhurst, NY: Dharma Drum Publications, 1987, pp. 47-70.

Readings

Assigned Readings

  1. Vimilakirtinirdesa Sutra, "Chapter 9"
  2. Mu Soeng. The Diamond Sutra in Zen Tradition

Traditional Readings

  1. Kasyapa Chapter on Wisdom and Compassion

Modern Readings

  1. Sheng-yen. The Seven Factors of Enlightenment
  2. Thich Nhat Hanh. The Three Gates of Liberation
  3. Sheng-yen. Emptiness
  4. Sheng-yen. Emptiness of Self
  5. Dainan Katagiri. Emptiness
  6. Sheng-yen. Commentary on the Heart Sutra
  7. Jack Risk. Introduction to the Heart Sutra

Short Readings by Theme

  1. Short quotes and poems on emptiness
  2. Short quotes and poems on not-self

Presentation Slides

Videos

Homework for the Coming Week

 

Session 9

Session 9: Beyond Language and Concepts

 

Theme Poems

Water clear in the jade stream;
Moonlight white over Cold Mountain.
Through wordless knowing, my spirit shines;
I watch the void, and the world becomes calm.

Hanshan in Clouds Thick, Whereabouts Unknown: Poems by Zen Monks of China. Translated by Charles Egan. Columbia University Press, 2010.

no going
no coming
at root transparent

not inside
nor outside
but in the centre
a pure crystal
without flaw

brightness reaches out
beyond man and heaven

Shide. Clouds Thick, Whereabouts Unknown: Poems by Zen Monks of China. Translated by Charles Egan. Columbia University Press, 2010.

Readings

Assigned Readings

  1. Jianzhi Sengcan. Faith in Mind
  2. Sheng-yen. Silent Illumination in Daily Life
  3. Sheng-yen. Ten Oxherding Pictures

Traditional Readings

  1. Huangbo. Transmission of Mind

Modern Readings

  1. Thich Nhat Hanh. Mindfulness Practice in Daily Life
  2. Jack Risk. Dealing with Releases
  3. Jack Risk. Dealing with Pain
  4. Sheng-yen. The Six Sense Faculties
  5. Sheng-yen. Retreat on Song of Mind
  6. Perry Schmidt-Leukel. Concept, Language, Reality
  7. Kosho Okamura. Dogen's Dropping Body and Mind

Short Readings by Theme

  1. Short quotes and poems on beyond language and concepts
  2. Short quotes and poems on consciousness
  3. Short quotes and poems on healing
  4. Short quotes and poems on real thought
  5. Short quotes and poems on unreal thought
  6. Short quotes and poems on suchness

Presentation Slides

Videos

Homework for the Coming Week

 

Session 10

Session 10: Without a Why

 

Theme Poems

Without desire everything is sufficient.
With seeking myriad things are impoverished.
Plain vegetables can soothe hunger.
A patched robe is enough to cover this bent old body.
Alone I hike with a deer.
Cheerfully I sing with village children.
The stream under the cliff cleanses my ears.
The pine on the mountain top fits my heart.

Ryokan. Kazuaki Tanahashi and Tensho David Schneider, ed. Essential Zen. Castle Books, 1996.

Imagine that we were wandering in the palace of No-Place.
Harmony and unity would be our themes, never ending, never failing.
Join with me in actionless action.
In simplicity and quietude.
In disinterest and purity.
In harmony and ease.
My intentions are now present aimless.
I go nowhere and have no idea how I got there;
I go and I come and don’t know why.
I have been, I have gone. I have no idea when my journey is over.
I wander and rest in limitless vastness.
Great knowledge comes in and I have no idea where it will all end.

Zhuangzi

How can we ever lose interest in life?
Spring has come again
And cherry trees bloom in the mountains.

Ryokan. One Robe, One Bowl: The Zen Poetry of Ryokan. Translated by J. Stevens. New York and Tokyo: Weatherhill, 1977.

Readings

Assigned Readings

  1. Dogen. Nanquan's Ordinary Mind is the Way
  2. Sheng-yen. Silent Illumination (shorter)

Traditional Readings

  1. Samyutta Nikaya (Buddha). "The Achievement of Mastery"
  2. Dogen. Genjokoan

Modern Readings

  1. Dalai Lama. Nine Stages of Progress
  2. Lama Dudjom Dorjee. Nine Stages of Progress
  3. Yin-shun. The Nine Stages of Absorption
  4. Sheng-yen. Methods Associated with Different Stages
  5. Sheng-yen. The Four Foundations of Mindfulness
  6. Sheng-yen. Dhyana and Samadhi
  7. Sheng-yen. Silent Illumination
  8. Yasutani. Shikantaza

Short Readings by Theme

  1. Short quotes and poems on doing nothing
  2. Short quotes and poems on mirror mind
  3. Short quotes and poems on without intention

Presentation Slides

Videos

Homework for the Coming Week

 

Evaluations

Online Evaluation Form

evaluation form

Please, click this button to open a pdf form in your browser.
Enter dates in dd/mm/yy format.
When you have completed the form, right click on the webpage and select "Print." Print the form to a pdf and save the pdf to your hard drive. Then email me a copy. Avoid the option to "Save" the webpage. This will not save your responses.

Do the same after each session.

Thank you,

Jack

 

What People Say

To study the buddha way is to study the self. To study the self is to forget the self. To forget the self is to be actualized by myriad things. When actualized by myriad things, your body and mind as well as the bodies and minds of others drop away. No trace of realization remains, and this no-trace continues endlessly.

- Dogan. Genjokoan.

Contact Jack

(204) 298-8586

(902) 680-0372

contactjackrisk.ca

Kentville, Nova Scotia, Canada

 

 

 

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